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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
family and friends, everything that you love all in the name of science. >>> "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning. thank you so much for being with me. i'm carol costello. this should be interesting. speaker john boehner meets this morning with house republicans who are angry at his new pitch to raise $800 billion in tax revenue in the fiscal cliff negotiations. president obama has said there will be no deal unless taxes are raised on the wealthiest americ americans. but staunch conservatives don't want any kind of new taxes. that's where speaker boehner's job gets really tough. on piers morgan tonight newt gingrich said if all else fails, go over the cliff. >> i think that no deal is better than a bad deal. i think going off this cliff is less dangerous than letting things build up for a year or two years to an even bigger cliff. i think that the president clearly has staked out a position of nonseriousness. and i think that it's very difficult for the house republicans right now to find any practical way to get his attention. so, he just won an election. he is feeling very goo
of his students. james crumb, a computer science teacher was starting class when a shooter broke in and assaulted crumb. more shocking the identity of the attacker. it was the teacher's own son. before 25-year-old christopher crumb had fatally stabbed his father's girlfriend at his home and he fatally stabbed his father before fatally stabbing himself. you smoke to neighbors and did the neighbors in fact tell you whether the teacher and his girlfriend, whether they were concerned, whether they had any fears, whether there are security issues? >> that's the question now is what happened to lead a son to kill his father. i spoke to a neighbor who lived directly across the street from heidi arnold and jim crumb. she said she met them last summer, that they largely kept to themselves but there were no red flags about any of this that potentially could have happened. and in a press conference with police, there weren't any red flags, i would could have been much, much worse. both of the professors are dead and there were six students in the the classroom at the time of the incident. t
to resemble a tumbleweed. this looks like something out of a science-fiction movie, what is it? >> it looks like it's out of space, right? >> it is pretty cool looking, though. >> the afghan designer modeled it after toys he used to play with as a child. and the concept here is that you have this, it's about 6 feet in diameter and weighs 154 pounds. and so it's light enough to be propelled by the wind but heavy enough so that when it rolls over the land mines it will detonate them upon contact. and it is made of a bio degradable plastic that's used to model feet on the bottom there and then the actual legs are made of bamboo shoots. >> we have seen balls like this in a little minesweeper thing, tell us how he designed this? >> why did he get the idea? it was a way to make a cheap and affordable technology people could use to survey the lands they live in. especially in the hazardous terrains. right now the technology and process is very expensive and can cost upwards of $1,000 just to clear one single mine. not to mention that many of these need to be detonated manually. but this mine has a
. and the first thing i thought was because we are not teaching them sciences or computer or technology. much of it had to do with up can't even answer a phone. you don't have social skills. you can't say please and thank you and do as you are told. what? >> i would like to see that report. i was just talking to someone that does manufacturing who works so many manufacturing policy in the government that said some of the numbers are overblown. some of those numbers, in fact are. i think you had someone from the consulting group saying? of those numbers are because -- you know, employers are not training and are not paying up for the skills. >> some of the argument has been that our education is so dismal we are not teaching people -- hold the phone for a minute here. dana bash from capitol hill is joining me. i heard your question. it was right on point. it was, i believe, question number one for the speaker. which was -- are you willing to start negotiating on the numbers of that top taxation issue between 35 and 39.5. you didn't get your answer. >> reporter: i didn't get my answer. but -- c
? >> reporter: at the houston museum of natural science, not concern but a lot of curiosity. >> yeah, it was going so fast, it actually gets through the atmosphere, that makes the flow. >> reporter: the museum's astronomer suspects it's a meteorite, a small piece of rock burning through space. fit meets the criteria. >> did it make a trail? did it actually move? did it change color? did it move from east to west? >> reporter: a lot of scientists searching for explanation to what's called the fireball over texas, a lot of people who aren't scientists as well. >> i've heard so many different things about, you know, 2012. so it's kind of scary because it's getting closer to that day. >> a nasa expert says it may have been a meteor. national weather service says it was probably just space junk. there you go. >>> his architectural masterpieces speak for themselves. oscar niedermayer's spread across the country of brazil. next why his legacy will go on long after his death. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in americ
could lose their jobs and science and public research grants could be cut including in to cancer and childhood diseases. fewer americans could receive drug abuse treatment and $700 million slashed from the epa budget. cutting back of food inspection. disaster relief, omb says, quote, the federal emergency management administration's ability to respond would be undermined. and finally, from border patrol to hiring new fbi agents, correction officers, federal prosecutors, all could be scaled back. now, all of these cuts, brooke, don't happen exactly at 12:01 a.m. on january 2nd. they happen over the course of a year. but agencies are preparing for an impasse in washington. this is exactly, exactly what policymakers are trying to avoid. brooke? >> thank you. >>> shock waves in washington today. powerful republican senator calling it quits. south carolina's senator jim demint will be stepping down december 31st to lead the heritage foundation. that's a powerful conservative think tank in d.c. demint says he can be more effective outside the senate. >> a lot of my role in the senate h
of these laws are 20 years old. you know how much we learned about -- in terms of the science. it just makes no sense in some of these states because it doesn't fit with what we know. >> i know you are not an attorney but -- i think you can answer this. how responsible -- i mean, the person -- each individual if you are a consenting adult, aren't you responsible for yourself and having safe sex with someone else even if you don't know -- >> sure. >> -- your status? you are responsible for yourself as a human being. >> absolutely. when you -- dig deeply into these laws and read them they obviously talk about that. but ultimately if somebody knows their stat us and don't disclose it, this is where the laws are focused. that's why so many people -- young people, are not getting tested. they don't want to know. >> the first man in the piece, his partner never got hiv. >> did you saw what his life was like. locked up, all of that. person we are talking about did not get the virus. >> thank you. great story. >> thank you. >> appreciate i. >> you can see more reporting from sanjay this weekend. sat
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)